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Thoracic Oncology Journal Articles, Videos And Insights

Thoracic Oncology:FEATURED Articles

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Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Every year, it causes more than 1.6 million deaths; more than breast, colon and prostate cancers combined.1 Non-small cell lu

Thoracic Oncology: INSIGHTS

The touchRESPIRATORY website provides a selection of resources to inform clinicians and patients about the latest developments in the field. The following are quick, non peer-reviewed, opinion-based updates addressing current trends and opinion on the most recent advances in the area of respiratory medicine:

Insight
Durvalumab: first immunotherapy to be approved for stage III non-small cell lung cancer Katrina Mountfort, Freelance Medical Writer for Touch Medical Media, UK

Thoracic Oncology:FEATURED VIDEOS

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Felix JF Herth discusses the challenges of diagnosing lung cancer and provides an overview of the Archimedes procedure. FILMED AT THE EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOCIETY (ERS) INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS, SEPTEMBER 2016 What are some of the clinical challenges physicians face today when diagnosing patients with lung cancer? 00:14 – So the question is where we are facing to diagnosing solitary pulmonary nodules in the future. Actually, most of our patients we see at the moment have bigger lesions, but we know that worldwide lung cancer screening by high resolution CT will be available. Doing CAT scans we will see more and more small lesions. So at the end we will see patients having a nodule of size around 1 cm. And then the question is how we diagnose those patients. All the endoscopic solutions we have at the moment failing when the nodules as smaller than 2 cm. So we have to look for new technologies which we can use, especially in the subset of patients we are finding due to lung cancer screening programmes. How about nodules that don’t have a direct guide airway path leading to them? 01:14 – When you compare what happens to smaller nodules, when you have big lesions you always have access by an airway to the lesion. But when the nodules get smaller and smaller and smaller, the nodule is in the tissue, and not longer in the airways. When you compare it to your car, you have an address, you type the address in your GPS and the GPS tells you where to go. But when you have a big house in a big garden, the system will bring you to the street but not through the garden to the house. So when we have smaller lesions, we need some navigation support to find those small lesions within the tissue. Therefore, we have to leave the airways and therefore we need new technologies. How does the Archimedes procedure work? 02:07 – The Archimedes procedure has new options to diagnose more lesions, really is offering a complete new approach to coin lesions, to small lesions. What we are doing with the help of a software, we’re looking where we can open the airways to create a new tunnel directly to the lesion. So what we’re doing, we look into the CAT scan, we’re creating based on the software support, so-called point of entry. At the point of entry, we are opening the bronchial wall and then we are tunnelling ourselves directly to the lesion which offers us a possibility to diagnose small lesions, but in the future, also to treat the lesion we just diagnosed. What do you tell your patients who go through this procedure? 03:02 – Then you have a patient in front of you with a nodule, he wants to know: How you can diagnose my nodule. As mentioned before, when you have a big nodule I can use a lot of endoscopic technologies. But when the patient is suffering on a small nodule, the only option I have is using the Archimedes system. I explain that the patient that we can do it endoscopically, that it’s a 20-minute procedure, and that we do not have any unexpected adverse event. When the patient don’t want to do that, no problem for me but then I have to send the patient to the surgeon, which have to do an open thoracotomy to the patient, which is for sure the more invasive procedure. Therefore, most of the patients, they want to have a minimally invasive procedure and therefore I have the Archimedes. And what happens after the diagnosis? 03:51 – Actually, at the moment when we are able to establish a diagnosis, we have to think about the therapy. We have a couple of percutaneous approach technologies, we have a stereotactic radio therapy. But at the moment there’s a lot of research ongoing to offer the patient an endoscopic solution. So do the diagnosis and then after diagnosing, in the same session, doing the endoscopic treatment through the tunnel. And I’m relatively sure the initial trials are already done, that we will have endoscopic solutions for the patients in the same session. So it’s really an…in one or two years the procedure we’ll say, “I used the Archimedes to diagnose the lesion and in the same session, at the same time, I directly treat the lesion.” And everything it done endoscopically, no opening of the body, maybe one in the hospital; so really minimally invasive.
M Patricia Rivera (University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, NC, US) is Chair of the ATS Assembly on Thoracic Oncology. Here she discusses the mission and scope of her Assembly, significant recent developments in her field and activities at ATS 2018 that have been of greatest interest. Questions 1. Tell us a little about the Assembly on Thoracic Oncology (0:11) 2. What have been the most significant recent developments in your field? (1:02) 3. What activities/presentations at ATS 2018 are of greatest interest to your assembly? (3:52) Speaker disclosure: M Patricia Rivera has nothing to disclose in relation to this video interview. Filmed at the American Thoracic Society (ATS) International Conference 2018, San Diego, CA, US, May 2018.

Thoracic Oncology:Latest Videos

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M Patricia Rivera (University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, NC, US) provides a valuable update on lung cancer, with a focus on important points the pulmonologist needs to know and the remarkable impact of personalised therapy. Questions Part 1 1. What are the most important points the...
M Patricia Rivera (University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, NC, US) is Chair of the ATS Assembly on Thoracic Oncology. Here she discusses the mission and scope of her Assembly, significant recent developments in her field and activities at ATS 2018 that have been of greatest...
Felix JF Herth discusses the challenges of diagnosing lung cancer and provides an overview of the Archimedes procedure. FILMED AT THE EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOCIETY (ERS) INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS, SEPTEMBER 2016 What are some of the clinical challenges physicians face today when diagnosing...
D. Planchard provides an expert perspective for results and toxicity data in trials performed in advanced squamous NSCLC and reported at ASCO 2015. In particular, he elaborates results of nedaplatin plus docetaxel in advanced or relapsed setting, afatinib vs erlotinib in second-line treatment, and...
Dr. Eric Vallières, thoracic surgeon, describes the phsycial challenges and risks for patients who undergo a pneumonectomy for lung cancer.
Thoracic oncologist Dr. Ben Levy highlights what he believes was the biggest news for lung cancer patients in 2014 as well as his take on exciting clinical trials taking place in lung cancer in 2015.

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